18th Irish Rifles Battalion County of London Regiment Collar Badge

 18th Irish Rifles Battalion County of London Regiment Collar Badge
£19.99
F2C/623 : £19.99
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Description

Guaranteed original. Complete & intact. F2C/623 This is an original 18th Irish Rifles Battalion County of London Regiment Collar Badge for sale. In good condition. Please see our other items for more original WW1, WW2 & post war British military cap badges for sale including other 18th Irish Rifles Battalion County of London Regiment Collar badges.
For more original cap badges for sale, click here. The London Irish Rifles (LIR) was a volunteer Rifle Regiment with a distinguished history, and now forms 'D' (London Irish Rifles) Company of the London Regiment. During the First World War, the LIR raised three Battalions, one of which stayed in reserve in England. The 1st Battalion was sent to France in 1915 and saw its first action at Festubert in May, before taking part in many of the major battles on the western front during the next three years. The 2nd Battalion served in France, Greece and Palestine. At the Battle of Loos, the 1st Battalion LIR particularly distinguished itself. While storming across No-Man's Land to capture the enemy trenches, Rifleman Frank Edwards, the Captain of the football team, kicked a football along in front of the troops. This earned the LIR probably their most famous Battle Honour - "Loos, 1915". The Loos football is still preserved in the Regimental Museum, and to this day, the memory of Rifleman Edwards and his comrades is commemorated every year at Connaught House on Loos Sunday. Over 1000 London Irishmen were killed during the conflict. The following battle honours were gained by the two battalions of the London Irish Rifles during the First World War: "Festubert, 1915" "Loos, 1915" "Somme, 1916,'18" "Flers-Courcelette" "Morval" "Le Transloy" "Messines, 1917" "Ypres, 1917" "Langemarck, 1917" "Cambrai, 1917" "St Quentin" "Bapaume, 1918" "Ancre, 1918" "Albert, 1918" "Pursuit to Mons" "France and Flanders, 1915-18" "Doiran, 1917" "Macedonia, 1916-17" "Gaza" "El Mughar" "Nebi Samwil" "Jerusalem" "Jericho" "Jordan" "Palestine, 1917-18". After the cessation of hostilities, the LIR was reduced to cadre strength, before being disbanded in May 1919 at Felixistowe. In February 1920, the 18th (County of London) Battalion of the London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) was reconstituted as a component of the 47th (2nd London) Division of the new Territorial Army, and in 1923, the designation of the Regiment was shortened to 18th London Regiment (London Irish Rifles). The Regiment's piper-green head-dress, the Caubeen, which was worn by all Irish regiments, and was characterised by being sloped to the left instead of the right only the LIR and Liverpool Irish having theirs sloping on the left - was adopted for wear by all ranks in 1937 in place of the service dress cap. In April 1939, the establishment of the Territorial Army was doubled and the 2nd Battalion, London Irish Rifles was reformed, initially as a component unit of the 47th (London) Infantry Division which was a 2nd Line duplicate of the 1st Line 56th (London) Infantry Division. The 70th Battalion, a Young Soldiers company of the London Irish Rifles, was also formed early in 1940, and set up for men between the ages of eighteen and nineteen and a half. The objective was to train them to the highest standard of drill, skill-at-arms, discipline and turnout in preparation for the time when they would be fit to take their place within the 1st and 2nd Battalions. The 70th Battalion ceased to exist in January 1943, when all such units were disbanded. Please see our other items for more original WW1, WW2 & post war British military badges for sale including other 18th Irish Rifles Battalion County of London Regiment collar badges.