2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment Collar Badge

 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment Collar Badge
£19.99
B1E/72 : £19.99
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Description

Guaranteed original. Complete & intact. This is an original 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment collar badge for sale. In good condition. Please see our other items for more original WW1, WW2 & post war British military cap badges for sale including other 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment cap badges, collar badges & shoulder titles.
For more original collar badges for sale, click here. The Monmouthshire Regiment was a territorial infantry regiment of the British Army. Originating in units of rifle volunteers formed in Monmouthshire in 1859, the regiment served in the Second Anglo-Boer War and the First and Second World Wars before losing its separate identity in 1967. 1/1st (Rifle) Battalion: redesignation of 1st Battalion in September 1914 on formation of second-line 2/1st Battalion. Transferred to the newly formed 28th Division in France in February 1915, they quickly saw service in the Second Battle of Ypres, suffering severe casualties. In May 1915 they were temporarily amalgamated with the 1/2nd and 1/3rd Battalions at Vlamertinghe in Flanders to form a composite unit. Brought up to strength with reinforcements, the 1/1st resumed its own identity in August 1915. In September 1915 they were assigned to the 46th (North Midland) Division as a pioneer battalion. They remained with the division for the rest of the war, and were at Avesnes in northern France at the time of the Armistice with Germany. 2/1st (Rifle) Battalion: formed as a second-line duplicate of the 1st Battalion in Newport in September 1914. It did not move outside the United Kingdom, performing home defence duties, mostly in Suffolk, as part of the 53rd and 68th Divisions. They were disbanded at Lowestoft in March 1918. 3/1st (Rifle) Battalion: formed as a "third-line" duplicate of the 1st Battalion in February 1915. They remained in the United Kingdom (in Shropshire and Flintshire). In April 1916 they were redesignated as the 1st (Reserve) Battalion. 1/2nd Battalion: redesignation of 2nd Battalion in September 1914 on formation of second-line 2/2nd Battalion. Transferred to the 4th Division in France in November 1914. They spent the winter taking part in trench warfare near Armentières. They subsequently took part in the Second Battle of Ypres in April and May 1915, fighting alongside the 1/1st and 1/3rd Monmouths in the 28th Division. Such were the losses that the three battalions were temporarily amalgamated. By July 1915 the 1/2nd had been brought up to strength and resumed its own existence. They transferred to the 29th Division as a pioneer battalion. They stayed in this role for the rest of the conflict, ending the war near Renaix in Belgium. They formed part of the army of occupation of Germany before returning to Pontypool where they were disbanded in June 1919. 2/2nd Battalion: formed as a second-line duplicate of the 2nd Battalion in Pontypool in September 1914. Their service and stations were identical with those of the 2/1st Battalion. They were disbanded at Lowestoft in April 1918. 3/2nd Battalion: formed as a "third-line" duplicate of the 2nd Battalion in February 1915. Their service and stations were identical with those of the 3/1st Battalion. In April 1916 they were redesignated as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion and in September 1916 was absorbed by the 1st (Reserve) Battalion. 1/3rd Battalion: redesignation of 3rd Battalion in September 1914 on formation of second-line 2/3rd Battalion. Transferred to the newly formed 28th Division in France in February 1915, fought alongside 1/1st and 1/2nd Battalions at the Second Battle of Ypres, due to losses they were temporarily amalgamated with the 1/2nd and 1/2nd Battalions. Brought up to strength with reinforcements, the 1/3rd resumed its own identity in August 1915. In September 1915 they were assigned to the 49th (West Riding) Division as a pioneer battalion. In 1916 they became GHQ troops. Due to the fact that many men in Monmouthshire were engaged in the vital wartime industries of coal-mining and steel making, it was found increasingly difficult to find drafts to reinforce the battalion, and on 31 August 1916 they were disbanded with troops transferred to the 1/1st and 1/2nd Battalions. 2/3rd Battalion: formed as a second-line duplicate of the 3rd Battalion in Abergavenny in September 1914. Their service and stations were identical with those of the 2/1st and 2/2nd Battalions. They were disbanded at Herringfleet in August 1917, with troops transferred to 2/1st and 2/2nd Battalions. 3/3rd Battalion: formed as a "third-line" duplicate of the 3rd Battalion in February 1915. Their service and stations were identical with those of the 3/1st Battalion. In April 1916 they were redesignated as the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion and in September 1916 was absorbed by the 1st (Reserve) Battalion. 4th Battalion: a redesignation of the 48th Provisional Battalion, Territorial Force in January 1917. This unit had been formed in June 1915 from personnel of the Monmouthshire and Herefordshire Regiments ineligible for service overseas. Stationed in Norfolk. The 2nd Battalion was mobilised on the outbreak of war in September 1939. After a long period of training in Northern Ireland and England, they landed in Normandy on 28 June 1944 as part of the 53rd Division. They took part in Operation Epsom, spending two weeks in trenches between Hill 112 and the River Odon. They next saw action in the Battle of the Falaise Gap in August 1944, and advanced with the 53rd Division, liberating Merville and crossing into the Netherlands. By October they had reached the Nederrijn and took part in the attack on 's-Hertogenbosch. In December 1944 they took part in the counter offensive against German advances in the Ardennes. In January 1945 they moved to The Netherlands for a period of training prior to Operation Veritable (the Battle of the Reichswald). They entered Germany on 8 February, taking part in a month's heavy fighting and suffering 300 casualties before being withdrawn for rest. The battalion continued to advance across Germany, forcing a crossing of the River Aller at Rethem on 11 April. This was their last major action of the war: they were at Hamburg when the German Instrument of Surrender came into effect. Please see our other items for more original WW1, WW2 & post war British military shoulder titles for sale including other 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment cap badges, collar badges & shoulder titles.